Forthcoming publication: Relationship between low-income patient census and substance use disorder treatment programs’ availability of tobacco cessation services

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Muilenburg, J. L., Laschober, T. C., & Eby, L. T. (in press). Relationship between low-income patient census and substance use disorder treatment programs’ availability of tobacco cessation services. Journal of Drug Issues.

Low income adults with substance use disorders (SUDs) have a high prevalence of tobacco use and often limited access to tobacco cessation treatment. This study examines the relationship between low-income SUD patient census (i.e., percentage of patients whose treatment costs are covered by Medicaid and Federal block grants) and SUD programs’ availability of three evidence-based tobacco cessation services: behavioral treatments, system-level support, and pharmacotherapy. Data were collected from a random sample of 1,006 program administrators in 2010. Mixed-effects models results show that the percentage of low-income patients is significantly positively associated with the availability of behavioral treatments and system-level support but not pharmacotherapy. Thus, low-income patients may have similar access to tobacco cessation pharmacotherapy but greater access to behavioral treatments and system-level support. However, the availability of tobacco cessation services is not widespread overall, which may hamper access to extensive services to address low-income SUD patients’ high smoking rates.

New publication: “Understanding why counselors implement tobacco cessation services with patients”

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Eby, L. T., Laschober, T. C., & Muilenburg, J. L. (in press). Understanding why counselors implement tobacco cessation services with patients. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment.

This study aimed to understand substance use disorder counselors’ implementation of evidence-based tobacco cessation services (TCS) with their patients who smoke. Drawing from an established adoption of innovations framework, we investigated the association between counselors’ perceptions of the availability of TCS (both pharmacotherapies and behavioral treatments) in their treatment program and the implementation of TCS (both pharmacotherapies and behavioral treatments) with their patients who smoke and whether this association is moderated by the strength of an organization’s climate for implementation and the fit of the innovation with users’ values. Data were collected in 2010 from 682 counselors working in 239 treatment programs across the U.S. that offer evidence-based TCS. Mixed-effect models showed that perceived availability of TCS was related with greater TCS implementation. This relationship was moderated by several indicators of climate for implementation but not by the fit of the innovation with users’ values.

New Publication: Developmental climate: a cross-level analysis of voluntary turnover and job performance

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Spell, H. B., Eby, L. T., & Vandenberg, R. J. (2014). Developmental climate: a cross-level analysis of voluntary turnover and job performance. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 3, 283-292.

This research investigates the influence of shared perceptions of developmental climate on individual-level perceptions of organizational commitment, engagement, and perceived competence, and whether these attitudes mediate the relationship between developmental climate and both individual voluntary turnover and supervisor-rated job performance. Survey data were collected from 361 intact employee–supervisory mentoring dyads and matched with employee turnover data collected one year later to test the proposed framework using multilevel modeling techniques. As expected, shared perceptions of developmental climate were significantly and positively related to all three individual work attitudes. In addition, both organizational commitment and perceived competence were significant mediators of the positive relationship between shared perceptions of developmental climate and voluntary turnover, as well as shared perceptions of developmental climate and supervisor-rated job performance. By contrast, no significant mediating effects were found for engagement. Theoretical implications, limitations, and future research are discussed.

New Publication on Tobacco Cessation Pharmacotherapy

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Muilenburg, J. L., Laschober, T. C., & Eby, L. T. (2014). Organizational factors as predictors of tobacco cessation pharmacotherapy adoption in addiction treatment programs. Journal of Addiction Medicine, 8, 59-65.

This study investigated 3 organizational factors (ie, counseling staff clinical skills, absence of treatment program obstacles, and policy-related incentives) as predictors of tobacco cessation pharmacotherapy (TCP) adoption (comprised of the 9 available TCPs) in addiction treatment programs using the innovation implementation effectiveness framework. Data were obtained in 2010 from a random sample of 1006 addiction treatment program administrators located across the United States using structured telephone interviews. According to program administrator reports, TCP is adopted in approximately 30% of treatment programs. Negative binomial regression results show that fewer treatment program obstacles and more policy-related incentives are related to greater adoption of TCP. Counter to prediction, clinical skills are unrelated to TCP adoption. Our findings suggest that organizational factors, on the basis of established theoretical frameworks, merit further examination as facilitators of the adoption of diverse TCP in addiction treatment programs.